Why the rising popularity of electric scooters is linked to a higher risk of injuries

Electric scooters may seem like a fun and convenient way to get around. They have become popular in urban areas because they enable a more environmentally friendly, car-free lifestyle. While electric scooters appear to be harmless, what many people do not realize is that some models can reach speeds of up to 30 mph and have the potential to cause accidents.

A recent study by researchers at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School found that riding electric scooters without a helmet has resulted in three times more facial and head injuries over the last decade. The number of accidents tripled from around 2,300 in 2008 to almost 7,000 in 2017. There were approximately 32,000 injuries nationwide during that period.

Laws regarding electric scooters are different in every state. In Florida, people can only ride motorized scooters and bicycles on sidewalks as they are not allowed on roads.

Earlier this year, electric scooter rental company Lime was sued for negligence by the family of a 28-year-old Florida woman who was left in a vegetative state after being hit in an accident. Lime was accused of violating state law by advising users to ride electric scooters on streets rather than sidewalks.

Electric scooters were first launched in South Florida in July 2018. Lime had a yearlong trial period with Broward County but saw a rise in accidents and complaints from the public. Other lawsuits have accused electric scooter companies of negligence and causing serious, even fatal injuries to riders and pedestrians.

The Rutgers researchers called for more “public awareness and policy to improve safety,” including standardized electric scooter laws and license requirements. If you decide to ride an electric scooter, make sure to wear a helmet and obey Florida laws regarding their use.